PLANTING

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PLANTING

Great wines are always produced from vines that are at least twenty years old. So the main objective of our wine-growing practices is to maintain the old vines in production for as long as possible. But their life expectancy doesn’t always fulfill our hopes...
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Great wines are always produced from vines that are at least twenty years old. So the main objective of our wine-growing practices is to maintain the old vines in production for as long as possible. But their life expectancy doesn’t always fulfill our hopes... In particular, the Cabernet Sauvignon variety, the heart of our vineyard and the soul of our wine, has a very high mortality rate.

The main solution is to replace the plants, one by one, as and when they die. This is called “complantation”. This practice, as old as the vineyard, occupies all our winegrowers for two months just after the winter pruning. We replace between 10,000 and 15,000 plants per year! But it’s only at the price of this lengthy work that we’re able to maintain the high density of planting in our plots (10,000 plants per hectare); this allows the harmonious management of the vigour of the vines.

The complants themselves have a limited life expectancy... At the end of the day, it’s the whole plot that expires. So we then have to carry out a complete renewal. What a sacrifice! First, we have to pull up all the vine stocks and then let the soil rest for six years. Finally, we replant it and wait until these new vines grow and age in order to produce great wine.