1815

THE "VERSAILLES OF THE MÉDOC"

For the building of the château, La Colonilla approached Louis Combes, a fashionable Bordeaux architect. At Margaux, Combes realised his work of art. Often nicknamed the “Versailles of the Médoc” the château is a rare example of the neo-palladian style in France.
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For the building of the château, La Colonilla approached Louis Combes, a fashionable Bordeaux architect. At Margaux, Combes realised his work of art. Often nicknamed the “Versailles of the Médoc” the château is a rare example of the neo-palladian style in France.

But Margaux isn’t just a refined, aristocratic, dwelling-house, it’s primarily, and especially, a farm. The genius of Combes was to be able to create a true small city of viticulture arranging, on both sides of the château, the buildings necessary for the production of one of the best wines in the world.

On one side, the tradesmen’s yard, with its houses and workshops, where the trades of plumber and mechanics are notably practiced ; the distance from Bordeaux made this necessary. At the beginning of the XVIII century, it was a good day’s journey.

On the other side, the cellars, the vat room and the cooperage. The large cellar, with its majestic perspectives and its tall white columns, evokes the spectacular image of a wine cathedral.

This is a complex that, progressively, visitors from all over the world are discovering when they arrive through the long avenue of one hundred-year-old plane trees that mark the entrance to the estate. It is one of superb and unique coherence.